Dentist Blog

Posts for: May, 2016

ResearchersLookingforLinksbetweenTMJDandOtherHealthConditions

It’s estimated that between 10 and 40 million adults in the U.S. suffer from chronic jaw pain and disability. Healthcare providers refer to it as temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD), a group of conditions characterized by pain and limited function with the jaw joints, as well as related muscles and tissues.

People with TMJD often experience popping, clicking or grating sounds when they move their lower jaw. The more serious symptoms, however, are severe pain and limited movement of the jaw. The causes of TMJD haven’t been fully substantiated, but it’s believed to be influenced by a person’s genetic background, their gender (most patients are women of childbearing age), their environment and behavioral habits. This uncertainty about the underlying causes has made it difficult to improve treatment strategies for the disorder.

One promising area of research, though, is suspected connections between TMJD and other health problems. In one survey of over 1,500 TMJD patients, nearly two-thirds indicated they had three or more other chronic conditions. Among the most frequently named were fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and sleep disturbances.

We’re not quite sure how or why TMJD might be linked to these other conditions, but further study is underway. Researchers hope any knowledge uncovered could lead to advances in our ability to diagnose, treat and prevent TMJD.

Until then, the more traditional treatment approach remains the best course of action: medication to relax muscles and relieve pain; thermal therapies using hot and cold compresses during flare-ups; and physical therapy. Switching to softer foods temporarily may also give jaw muscles a rest from over-activity. Although jaw surgery is an option, we should consider it a last resort after other therapies have proven altogether ineffective in relieving pain and restoring function.

If you suspect you have TMJD, please visit a medical doctor first. Other conditions could mimic the symptoms of the disorder and would need to be ruled out first. If the diagnosis is TMJD, you’re not alone. You can receive information, support and updates on the latest research by visiting the TMJ Association at www.tmj.org.

If you would like more information on chronic jaw pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Chronic Jaw Pain and Associated Conditions.”


ActorDavidRamseyDiscussesBabyBottleToothDecay

Cavities can happen even before a baby has his first piece of candy. This was the difficult lesson actor David Ramsey of the TV shows Arrow and Dexter learned when his son DJ’s teeth were first emerging.

“His first teeth came in weak,” Ramsey recalled in a recent interview. “They had brown spots on them and they were brittle.” Those brown spots, he said, quickly turned into cavi­ties. How did this happen?

Ramsey said DJ’s dentist suspected it had to do with the child’s feedings — not what he was being fed but how. DJ was often nursed to sleep, “so there were pools of breast milk that he could go to sleep with in his mouth,” Ramsey explained.

While breastfeeding offers an infant many health benefits, problems can occur when the natural sugars in breast milk are left in contact with teeth for long periods.  Sugar feeds decay-causing oral bacteria, and these bacteria in turn release tooth-eroding acids. The softer teeth of a young child are particularly vulnerable to these acids; the end result can be tooth decay.

This condition, technically known as “early child caries,” is referred to in laymen’s terms as “baby bottle tooth decay.” However, it can result from nighttime feedings by bottle or breast. The best way to prevent this problem is to avoid nursing babies to sleep at night once they reach the teething stage; a bottle-fed baby should not be allowed to fall asleep with anything but water in their bottle or “sippy cup.”

Here are some other basics of infant dental care that every parent should know:

  • Wipe your baby’s newly emerging teeth with a clean, moist washcloth after feedings.
  • Brush teeth that have completely grown in with a soft-bristled, child-size toothbrush and a smear of fluoride toothpaste no bigger than a grain of rice.
  • Start regular dental checkups by the first birthday.

Fortunately, Ramsey reports that his son is doing very well after an extended period of professional dental treatments and parental vigilance.

“It took a number of months, but his teeth are much, much better,” he said. “Right now we’re still helping him and we’re still really on top of the teeth situation.”

If you would like more information on dental care for babies and toddlers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Age One Dental Visit” and “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”


By Murphy Dental Group
May 11, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: bad breath  
ProperCleaningTechniquescanHelpyouControlChronicBadBreath

We all experience the occasional bout of bad breath from dry mouth or after eating certain foods. Chronic halitosis, on the other hand, could have an underlying health cause like periodontal (gum) disease, sinus infections or even systemic illnesses like diabetes. Anyone with persistent halitosis should undergo a thorough examination to determine the root cause.

If such an examination rules out a more serious cause, it’s then possible the particular population of bacteria that inhabit your mouth (out of a possible 600 or more strains) and your body’s response makes you more susceptible to halitosis. After feeding on food remnants, dead skin cells or post-nasal drip, certain types of bacteria excrete volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) that give off an odor similar to “rotten eggs.”

In this case, we want to reduce the bacterial population through plaque removal, which in turn reduces the levels of VSCs. Our approach then is effective oral hygiene and perhaps a few cleanings — the basics every person should practice for good oral health — along with a few extra measures specific to chronic halitosis.

This calls for brushing and flossing your teeth daily. This will remove much of the plaque, the main breeding and feeding ground for bacteria, that has accumulated over the preceding twenty-four hours. In some cases, we may also recommend the use of an interproximal brush that is more adept in removing plaque clinging to areas between the teeth.

You may also need to pay special attention in cleaning another oral structure contributing to your bad breath — your tongue. The back of the tongue in particular is a “hideout” for bacteria: relatively dry and poorly cleansed because of its convoluted microscopic structure, bacteria often thrive undisturbed under a continually-forming tongue coating. Simply brushing the tongue may not be enough — you may also need to use a tongue scraper, a dental device that removes this coating. (For more information, see the Dear Doctor article, “Tongue Scraping.”)

Last but not least, visit our office for cleanings and checkups at least twice a year. Professional cleanings remove bacterial plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) you’re unable to reach and remove with daily hygiene measures. Following this and the other steps described above will go a long way toward eliminating your bad breath, as well as enhancing your total oral health.

If you would like more information on treating chronic bad breath, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”